A United Kingdom (2016)

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The captivating true-life romance that drew an English office clerk and the future King of Botswana into a future of rippling prosperity and incredible global influence. In a world of common interracial relationships, British filmmaker Amma Asante illustrates the remarkable history of two individuals who forged a difficult path to acceptance, love and unshaken equality for all.

A United Kingdom evolves from the very moment a simple insurance clerk, played by Rosamund Pike, and a nice African chap, David Oyelowo (who also happens to be the heir of the throne to Bechuanaland) meet at a London Missionary Society Dance. Following a secret year-long courtship, the couple marry in 1948, triggering an immediate and highly severe diplomatic fallout between Bechuanaland, London and South Africa. What unfolds is a long and treacherous battle for equality, for peace and for justice in a place where white women are buffeted and prodded.

One day things have to change and it has to start somewhere.

The film’s appeal undoubtedly lies in watching Ruth and Seretse together, while every force around them conspires to tear them apart. Pike and Oyelowo’s chemistry is truly sincere, elegant and awe-inspiring, remaining composed and full of strength in pressure that would destroy anything but wholehearted love and commitment. Oyelowo also brings to his role a stillness and poise reflective of Martin Luther King, in which his reticence and influence blossoms. This deep romance and commitment, painted on a backdrop of horror and destruction, draws out the very best in humanity’s ability to conquer all.

I think that A United Kingdom’s greatest strength in fact lies in its ability to showcase that love can conquer all, even in times of incredible heartache. Without the persistence to create change in a seemingly imperfect world, nothing worthwhile would ever come about.

I want to make pieces of entertainment and art that mean something,” director Amma Asante recently told the BBC, “I want to make movies that leave some kind of mark on you.” But A United Kingdom does more than just simply leave a mark, with its nicely paced and intelligent depiction of a story almost too good to be true. A chapter of heartstring jerking history that deserves a close reading.

★★★★★

Imdb – 6.7/10  Rotten Tomatoes – 89%

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